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Chase Mobile finally gets an update for iOS 7


Posted on: April 19th, 2014 by
 

If you’re a Chase bank customer you’ll notice a rather significant change to the Chase Mobile app when you fire it up today. It’s finally been updated to officially support iOS 7. Well, I guess 7 months late is better than never, right?

The new version of Chase Mobile only brings one new feature with it which is the ability to send and reply to messages. Other than that, all energy and effort was put behind completely redoing the interface and design. For those used to using the Chase Mobile app, be forewarned it’s a lot different this time around.

Unfortunately the iPad version hasn’t received an update for iOS 7 just yet. Hopefully that’ll change soon as well. For those who use Chase Mobile regularly, how do you feel about the new design and layout? Better, worse, or don’t care? Let me know in the comments!








Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheIphoneBlog/~3/-jGlqRWU4vc/story01.htm
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Samsung Galaxy S5 Is a Baby Monitor That Reports to Your Smartwatch

Samsung’s new flagship smartphone, the Galaxy S5 , has a surprising hidden feature that tech bloggers have just discovered: the phone can double as a baby monitor—provided you’ve got it paired to a Galaxy Gear smartwatch. And y’know, you don’t mind leaving your baby and your phone behind while you’re in another room.

Read more…


    







Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/sdCTBGwveNQ/samsung-galaxy-s5-is-a-baby-monitor-that-reports-to-you-1554373685
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No one likes a price hike, especially mid-contract. Neither does UK regulator Ofcom it seems, which is setting out new policy clarification for mobile, broadband and landline suppliers. The guidance is to prevent different “interpretations” of existing policy, and will ensure customers can leave …

Source: http://feeds.engadget.com/~r/weblogsinc/engadget/~3/9PLF2w4bIEI/
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Microsoft Windows 8.1


Posted on: October 21st, 2013 by
 

Increased tablet sales and declining desktop and laptop sales make one thing clear: People want tablets. But they still need computers capable of multitasking high-power applications. With both Mac and PC sales down, Microsoft took this problem on with a completely reimagined new operating system concept in Windows 8, a system designed to be at home with both casual home use on tablets and serious business and digital media creation scenarios on desktops and laptops. Windows 8.1 doesn’t abandon this strategy—far from it—but addresses a lot of shortcomings in Microsoft’s first hybrid OS attempt.

Coming just about a year after Windows 8′s release, Windows 8.1 is a free upgrade through the Windows app store for existing Windows 8 users. It will be available to anyone else from the Microsoft Web Store, as a packaged DVD and on new PCs, laptops, and tablets, starting October 18. As with Windows 8, there’s a standard and a Pro version, priced at $119.99 and 199.99 respectively. The Pro version adds business capabilities like disk encryption and network domain joining, and is required for those who want Windows Media home theater capability.

Birthing an entirely new class of product that looks like nothing that came before is not always the smoothest of endeavors, and it’s no secret that Windows 8 has met with a good deal of resistance. With Windows 8.1, Microsoft has moved faster than ever before to address concerns with a new OS release. And the device convergence may be taking a step farther, with reports that Microsoft is expected to combine the app stores for Windows Phone and Windows 8. This will be a boon to Windows 8, which, though it already boasts over 120,000 apps of its own, according to the MetroStore Scanner site, still trails Android and iTunes app stores by six figures and lacks some big names. An official Facebook app only appeared simultaneously with the 8.1 release.

Most of the major new features in Windows 8.1 have been widely available in the Preview version of the OS, though there have been some tweaks. The updated Mail app was not yet available at Preview time, and it adds much-needed things like drag-and-drop to folders. The Help+Tips app is also new in the released Windows 8.1, as are improvements to the Camera app for tablets, such as the very cool 360 panorama.


Improvements include a more consistent look between the desktop and mobile app interfaces, lock screen slideshow and notifications, better help to get people going with the new interface, the ability to boot to the desktop, a Start button, more windowing options for new-style mobile apps, and more settings in the new-style interface. The Windows app store gets a much-needed face-lift, and the default apps like Mail, Internet Explorer, Skype, Xbox Music and Video, and search also benefit from updates.

Help+Tips
The new Help+Tips app that debuts in Windows 8.1 addresses the top criticism of Windows 8—that it’s confusing to use. Actually, Windows 8 could not be simpler to use for a lot of things—what’s so hard about clicking a big tile with the name of an app on it to run it? But some essential activities of the OS are less obvious. Things like using the Charms (an always-accessible menu button bar along the right side of the screen), switching apps, and moving between desktop and new-style interface are all covered in the Help+Tips app.


Help+Tips’ simple six panel interface offers help options titled Start and apps, Get around, Basic actions, Your account and files, Settings, and What’s new. Going through the whole batch is not a major undertaking either, with its simple animated images showing frequently needed gestures. The new app does a lot to allay Window 8 fears and uncertainties of new users. Even if they don’t visit this help app, Windows 8.1 adds pointers right in the interface showing how to use it.

Start Button and Boot to Desktop
Two features that longtime Windows users cried out for after Windows 8′s original release have made their way into Windows 8.1—the Start button and the ability to boot to the desktop, where standard Windows programs can run just as they have for the last few versions of the OS. The Start button Microsoft has included, however, isn’t quite what the longtime users were hoping for, since it opens the new-style Start screen.


But really, if you think of this as a full-screen start button menu, you’ll use Windows 8.1 just as swiftly as its predecessors. (For more tips on quickly mastering the new OS, read my 5 Tips for Using Windows 8.1 Like a Boss.) The boot-to-desktop option is found in the Taskbar’s settings dialog, shown here:


New Start Tile and Window Options
The tile-based Start screen has gotten more flexible, now with four size choices instead of Windows 8′s two. Added are a huge square, for apps with a lot of live info to display, like mail, and a tiny one, for apps with nothing to update live. Not all apps have all size choices, depending on what the app developer deems sensible.  


The Start screen gets more than just new tile sizes. It also can now display animated backgrounds, or use the same background as the desktop wallpaper, for a more unified interface experience. So that the Start screen doesn’t get overwhelmingly cluttered with app tiles, now apps only are automatically added to the All App screen, not to the Start screen, but in Windows 8.1, you can get to this All Apps list simply by swiping up on the Start screen.


As to new-style app windowing, more than two modern apps can now share the screen. No longer are you restricted to a large window and one slender side panel, but two apps can each take up half the screen, or, depending on what the app’s developer has allowed, any portion you choose. The number of apps depends on how large the screen is and its pixel density.

Apps can even sprout a second new-style window when it makes sense such as the new Reading List app, which keeps the list in a narrow left-side panel while the content you want to read takes up most of the screen. With multiple monitors, you can further augment the number of windows. Speaking of external monitors, Windows 8.1 supports Miracast, which lets you send video over Wi-Fi to large HDTVs and the like.

The Lock screen also has new tricks: It can act as a slideshow display of your photos, rather than just showing a static picture. The slides are chosen with some intelligence, too, rather than simply rotating through all your photos; for example, you may see photos from around the same time of year in previous years. Another big help, especially for small tablets, is access to the camera without the need to log in. The same goes for answering Skype calls—just tap on the notification to start videochatting with grandma.

A big bugaboo of mine for Windows 8 was that you have two Settings tools—the new-style one and the traditional Control Panel on the desktop. Windows 8.1 still maintains this duality, but the modern UI settings have gotten far more robust, eliminating the need to head to the massive number of choices in desktop Control Panel. For example, now you can configure display settings, change mouse and typing options, and see PC info. You can even make new adjustments, like changing the app-switching behavior in the Corners and Edges section.


Another peeve of mine was that, in order to sync documents with SkyDrive, you had to have two SkyDrive apps running on Windows 8, the modern and the desktop version. Now SkyDrive document syncing is a built-in capability of the OS, and it offers an option that lets you access any files on a PC, even if you didn’t explicitly upload the file to SkyDrive. I still wish you could upload from the Pictures app, and auto-upload the way you can in Windows Phone.


Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ziffdavis/pcmag/~3/jklX7jcHhGk/0,2817,2425883,00.asp
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Mischa Barton Talks Psych Ward Stay


Posted on: October 18th, 2013 by
 

She’s had a career full of ups and downs, and it seems Mischa Barton wasn’t wired to handle all the drama she was forced to endure.

The “O.C.” actress told People that she actually ended up on a 5150 hold at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center’s psychiatric ward after taking a sedative, blacking out, and threatening suicide.

Barton noted, “It was a full-on breakdown. I was under enormous pressure. I’ve learned a lot. I’m stronger now.”

Part of Mischa’s problem stemmed from her fluctuating weight. “It was always, ‘She’s too skinny, she must be sick. Then it was, ‘She’s too big.’ I was never the right weight.”

And now that she’s received the help she needs, Mischa is doing much better!

Source: http://celebrity-gossip.net/mischa-barton/mischa-barton-talks-psych-ward-stay-943744
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As Gitmo Plods, Obama’s Winning The Case For Court


Posted on: October 15th, 2013 by
 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Four years after his failed effort to bring the 9/11 mastermind to New York for trial, President Barack Obama has reinstated the federal courthouse as America’s preferred venue for prosecuting suspected terrorists.

His administration has done so by quietly securing conviction after conviction in the civilian judicial system. Meanwhile at Guantanamo Bay, admitted 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed’s case moves at a snail’s pace.

Tuesday’s expected arraignment of suspected al-Qaida member Abu Anas al-Libi is the latest example of Obama’s de facto policy. Al-Libi was captured in a military raid in Libya earlier this month and had been under interrogation aboard a U.S. warship.

The Obama administration says it considers all options for prosecuting terrorists, weighing military and civilian trials on a case-by-case basis.

But Guantanamo Bay, the U.S. military base that embodied America’s post-9/11 methods of interrogating and prosecuting suspected terrorists, has turned into a legal morass. The military commission’s poor case record has become less about winning and more about completion.

While the Justice Department says more than 125 people have been convicted of terrorism charges in federal courts since 2009, not a single military commission has come to a close during that period.

Of the few military commissions completed under President George W. Bush, most resulted in short sentences or have been overturned.

“There’s really no comparison in terms of the success rate,” said David Raskin, the former top national security prosecutor at the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Manhattan. “Not really between wins or losses, just finishing the cases. There’s no comparison at this point.”

The politics are breaking Obama’s way too.

When Attorney General Eric Holder announced in 2009 that Mohammed would be tried in New York City, the outcry from both political parties was great.

Some feared a high-profile terrorism trial would put the city at risk. Others said a civilian courthouse, with all the rights afforded defendants there, was no place for a terrorist.

Obama, who came into office promising to close Guantanamo Bay and prosecute terrorists in federal courts, buckled under the pressure and pulled the case back to Guantanamo.

Since then, not much has changed at the naval base in Cuba. Mohammed is one of 164 men held there and one of six facing trial. Those trials have stalled largely because of legal challenges to the commission system itself.

In federal courts, however, the Obama administration is quietly churning through terror cases and putting many terrorists away for life.

One of the first key cases was against Ahmed Ghailani, a former Guantanamo detainee who was transferred to New York early in Obama’s administration. He was convicted in 2010 and is serving a life sentence in prison.

Last year, Mohanad Shareef Hammadi, an Iraqi man, pleaded guilty to terrorism charges in Kentucky and was sentenced to life in prison without parole. Hammadi’s co-defendant got a 40-year sentence for his role in a plot to ship weapons and cash to insurgents in Iraq.

Ahmed Abdulkadir Warsame, a Somali citizen accused of helping support and train al-Qaida-linked militants, pleaded guilty earlier this year. Like al-Libi, he was questioned aboard a U.S. warship before being turned over to the civilian justice system.

Each new trial brought fresh criticism from Republicans, but that criticism diminished each time.

Some Republican lawmakers criticized Monday’s announcement that al-Libi would face trial in court. They questioned whether interrogators questioned him long enough.

“It certainly begs the question whether rushing foreign terrorists into U.S. courts is a strategy that is in the best interests of the United States,” said Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee.

But in the midst of a major budget debate in Washington, the matter got little attention.

The White House, which once fought back against such criticism, now shows little interest in renewing a debate that proved to be a political distraction.

So the administration said nothing when al-Libi arrived in the United States on Saturday. Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney for the southern district of New York, issued a two-sentence statement Monday, saying only that al-Libi was due in court to answer charges dating back more than a decade.

Al-Libi, whose full name is Nazih Abdul-Hamed al-Ruqai, is accused of helping plan and conduct surveillance for the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Africa.

“A federal civilian criminal trial is by far the safest and the one that would raise the least complex set of legal problems for the administration,” said Steve Vladick, a professor at American University law school.

That’s because al-Libi was indicted more than a decade ago, which meant the government did not need any evidence it gathered against him during his interrogation.

Intelligence officials questioned him for a week aboard the USS San Antonio. Interrogations at sea have replaced CIA “black sites” as the U.S. government’s preferred method for holding suspected terrorists and questioning them without access to lawyers.

Al-Libi’s al-Qaida ties date back to the terrorist group’s early years, according to court documents. That would make him a valuable source of information about the group’s history.

In an interview last week on the PBS program “NewsHour,” Lisa Monaco, the president’s homeland security adviser, said the first priority in capturing al-Libi was to get intelligence.

“I think what it shows is a very clear strategy by the U.S. government to use all the tools, frankly, in our toolbox to disrupt threats, to go after — consistent with the rule of law — individuals who pose a threat, to get intelligence and then ultimately to make a decision about what the best disposition is,” Monaco said.

So far, in every instance that the Obama administration has had a terrorist suspect in custody, it has found the best disposition was the federal court system.

Source: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=234569322&ft=1&f=
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AP

Apple CEO Tim Cook is going to get raked over the coals by Congress for the company’s spectacular tax-dodging techniques.

No one is suggesting that any of these techniques are illegal.

No one is suggesting that Apple is doing anything that any number of other massive multi-national companies aren’t doing.

And no one is suggesting that companies should voluntarily pay more taxes than they absolutely have to pay.

But boy are Apple’s tax-dodging techniques effective.

And, boy, do they make clear that the United States (and, ideally, other world governments) have to get together to simplify corporate tax policies. Or else this highly sophisticated tax-dodging will continue to become a bigger and bigger source of corporate profitability.

In preparation for the televised Congressional grilling, Congress has released a document laying out what it contends are some of Apple’s tax-dodging techniques.

Apple, meanwhile, has released its own testimony, in which it points out that it?is one of the largest U.S. taxpayers and?explains that it does not resort to some of the “gimmicks” that other companies use to avoid U.S. taxes.

These positions, importantly, are not mutually exclusive. And the respective arguments will give you a sense of how complex this issue is.

Here’s what Congress says Apple has been doing to dodge taxes:

  • Using a so-called cost sharing agreement to transfer valuable intellectual property assets offshore and shift the resulting profits to a tax haven jurisdiction.
  • Taking advantage of weaknesses and loopholes in tax law and regulations to ?disregard? offshore subsidiaries for tax purposes, shielding billions of dollars in income that could otherwise be taxable in the United States.
  • Negotiating a tax rate of less than 2 percent with the government of Ireland ? significantly lower than that nation?s 12% statutory rate ? and using Ireland as the base for its extensive network of offshore subsidiaries.

That’s the standard stuff. And here’s where it gets really impressive:

In addition to those standard multinational tactics, Apple established at the apex of its offshore network an offshore holding company that it says is not tax resident in any nation. That subsidiary, Apple Operations International, has no employees and no physical presence, but keeps its bank accounts and records in the United States and holds its board meetings in California. It was incorporated in Ireland in 1980, and is owned and controlled by the U.S. parent company, Apple Inc. ?Ireland asserts tax jurisdiction only over companies that are managed and controlled in Ireland, but the United States bases tax residency on where a company is incorporated. Exploiting the gap between the two nations? tax laws, Apple Operations International has not filed an income tax return in either country, or any other country, for the past five years. ?From 2009 to 2012, it reported income totaling $30 billion.?

A second Irish subsidiary claiming not to be a tax resident anywhere is Apple Sales International which, from 2009 to 2012, had sales revenue totaling $74 billion.? The company appears to have paid taxes on only a tiny fraction of that income, resulting, for example, in an effective 2011 tax rate of only five hundreds of one percent.?

In addition to creating non-tax resident affiliates, Apple Inc. has utilized U.S. tax loopholes to avoid U.S. taxes on $44 billion in otherwise taxable offshore income over the past four years, or about $10 billion in tax avoidance per year. A third subsidiary, Apple Operations Europe, also has no tax residency, according to Apple.

Wouldn’t you like to have no country of tax residency even as you live and do business in many countries?

So would we!

Too bad we’re not all wealthy global multi-national corporations.

Now, in its defense, Apple says the government is misconstruing its non-resident legal entities, which, Apple says, exist for business reasons, not tax reasons. Apple further says that it does not use any tax “gimmicks” at all.

  • Apple pays an extraordinary amount in US taxes. Apple is likely the largest corporate?income tax payer in the US, having paid nearly $6 billion in taxes to the US Treasury in FY2012. These payments account for $1 in every $40 in corporate income tax the US?Treasury collected last year. The Company?s FY2012 total US federal cash effective tax?rate was approximately 30.5%.1?The Company expects to pay over $7 billion in taxes to?the US Treasury in its current fiscal year. In accordance with US law, Apple pays US?corporate income taxes on the profits earned from its sales in the US and on the?investment income of its Controlled Foreign Corporations (?CFCs?), including the?investment earnings of its Irish subsidiary, Apple Operations International (?AOI?).
  • Apple does not use tax gimmicks. Apple does not move its intellectual property into?offshore tax havens and use it to sell products back into the US in order to avoid US tax;?it does not use revolving loans from foreign subsidiaries to fund its domestic operations;?it does not hold money on a Caribbean island; and it does not have a bank account in the?Cayman Islands. Apple has substantial foreign cash because it sells the majority of its?products outside the US. International operations accounted for 61% of Apple?s revenue?last year and two-thirds of its revenue last quarter. These foreign earnings are taxed in?the jurisdiction where they are earned (?foreign, post-tax income?).

Apple also adds that it would be happy to pay more taxes if the U.S. Congress would simplify tax rates and lower corporate income taxes.

What’s the answer here?

The answer is to simplify–and likely lower–corporate tax rates, while offsetting the lost revenue by increasing taxes on corporate shareholders. But somehow we doubt that that will be Congress’s message in the hearings.

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/apple-tax-dodging-techniques-2013-5

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Pole dancing?! ‘Dancing’ finals get freaky


Posted on: May 21st, 2013 by
 

TV

2 hours ago

Image: Mark and Aly

ABC

Mark Ballas and Aly Raisman perform their freestyle on “DWTS.”

After 10 weeks of showing just what they can do on the dance floor, the finalists from “Dancing With the Stars” had a chance to prove to viewers that they saved the best for last — or at least that was the idea going in to Monday night’s finals.

Of course, it didn’t quite go that way for every act.

As longtime fans of the ballroom bash know, in the end, it all comes down to the freestyle. Forget the cha-cha-relay-this or the judges-pick-that. Fair or not, it’s that one no-holds-barred routine that leaves the lasting impression.

So, given that, is a synchronized pole dance really the last impression a contestant wants to make?

That’s the question Aly Raisman and her pro partner, Mark Ballas, should have asked themselves before the show, because when it was time to shine, that’s what they delivered — a flashy, splashy pole dance.

To make matters worse for Aly, they didn’t even deliver it very well. Oh, sure, Len Goodman and his fellow panelists raved about the number — Bruno Tonioli even dubbed it “futuristic with a touch of the erotic” — and they awarded her a perfect score. But the officials had to ignore a lack of musicality, out-of-synch steps and one blatant flub to do it.

When added to her so-so cha-cha performance and a shake-filled samba from earlier in evening, the gymnast claimed 61 points for the night.

That left Aly trailing behind this season’s “Dancing” queens, Kellie Pickler and Zendaya, each of whom earned every point of their perfect freestyle scores.

It was Kellie who performed the night’s most unforgettable dance. Rather than bringing out the fireworks or other dancers (or, you know, poles) for her effort, the “American Idol” alum and pro Derek Hough scaled back the production completely and relied solely on precision contemporary moves.

The risk paid off. Without distractions, there was no room for errors — and there weren’t any. The emotion-packed dance just featured clean lines and impeccable timing.

Kellie’s moves left Carrie Ann Inaba in tears, and inspired a rare sort of rave from Len.

After giving her a standing ovation and praising the performance, he said his 10 paddle should have been an 11.

Kellie could have used that better-than-perfect extra point, considering that with her cha-cha and quickstep scores, she was just one digit behind her closest competition with a 64.

Zendaya’s freestyle wasn’t quite the emotional powerhouse that Kellie’s was, but it was perfectly performed all the same. The routine pro Val Chmerkovskiy choreographed for her blended cha-cha, contemporary and hip-hop, showing off a wide range of the Disney star’s skills — very formidable skills.

Len called her earlier samba “eye-popping, show-stopping, jaw-dropping,” but it was Zendaya’s freestyle where he said “it all came together.”

Thanks to those dances — and her cha-cha win — Zendaya topped the leaderboard with 65 for the night.

But the night didn’t go as well for the last man standing in the competition. Kellie and Zendaya may have aced it where points were concerned, and Aly was off-point with her dance, but Jacoby Jones? It seemed like he missed the point altogether.

He charmed fans all season with his big dance improvements and even bigger personality, but when it really mattered, he offered up one of his weakest routines.

His “supersized” freestyle alongside pro Karina Smirnoff relied too much on what he could do in his sleep — imprecise silliness — and not enough the impressive moves he mastered this season.

With that, and his cha-cha and jive, he went from the top of the leaderboard last week to the bottom this week.

But the leaderboard only matters so much at this point in the game. The judges only get half of the say on finale night, and fan votes have the rest of the sway.

Tell us who you want to see holding the mirror-ball trophy on Tuesday night.

Source: http://www.today.com/entertainment/pole-dancing-ballroom-dancing-stars-finals-get-freaky-6C9996528

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[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 20-May-2013
[ | E-mail | Share Share ]

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California – Los Angeles Health Sciences

Older prostate cancer patients with other underlying health conditions should think twice before committing to surgery or radiation therapy for their cancer, according to a multicenter study led by researchers in the UCLA Department of Urology.

The study reports the 14-year survival outcomes of 3,000 men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1994 and 1995. The results suggest that older patients with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer and who have at least three underlying health problems, or comorbidities, were much more likely to die of something other than their cancer, said study first author Dr. Timothy Daskivich, a UCLA Robert Wood Johnson fellow.

“For men with low- to intermediate-risk disease, prostate cancer is an indolent disease that doesn’t pose a major risk to survival,” Daskivich said. “The take home point from this study is that older men with multiple underlying health problems should carefully consider whether they should treat these tumors aggressively, because that treatment comes with a price.”

Aggressive treatments for prostate cancer, including surgery, external radiation and radioactive seed implants, can result in major side effects, including erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence and bowel problems. Also, the survival advantage afforded by these treatments does not develop until approximately eight to 10 years after treatment. In many cases, either “watchful waiting” or “active surveillance”- monitoring the patient’s cancer very closely with regular biopsies and intervening with surgery or radiation if the disease progresses – is better than hitting the disease with everything in the treatment arsenal, Daskivich said.

The study appears May 21, 2013 in the early online issue of the peer-reviewed journal Annals of Internal Medicine.

The men in the study completed surveys within six months of diagnosis to document what other medical conditions they had at that time. Researchers then determined survival outcomes at 14 years from the time of diagnosis using information from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database.

“This was a great opportunity to get a glimpse at the long-term outcomes of these men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the mid-1990s,” Daskivich said. “What we were most interested in was their survival outcomes. We wanted to prove that in older men with other health problems, the risk of dying from their cancer paled in comparison to the risk that they’d die from something else.”

The study looked at older patients with three or more comorbidities, such as diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure and arthritis. Researchers found that the 10-year risks of dying from causes other than prostate cancer in men 61 to 74 and men older than 75 with three or more comorbidities were 40 percent and 71 percent, respectively. In comparison, the 14-year risks of dying from low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer were 3 percent and 7 percent, respectively, which Daskivich characterized as low.

“If you’re very unlikely to benefit from treatment, then don’t run the risk and end up dealing with side effects that can significantly impact quality of life,” he said. “It’s important for these men to talk to their doctors about the possibility of forgoing aggressive treatment. We’re not talking about restricting care, but the patient should be fully informed about their likelihood of surviving long enough to benefit from treatment.”

However, Daskivich said, older men with high-risk, aggressive prostate cancers may benefit from treatment so they don’t die of their cancers. The risk of death from high-risk prostate cancer was 18 percent over the 14 years of this study.

Daskivich said there was very little long-term data prior to this study on which patients could base these crucial decisions. The study will result in patients who are much better informed on the risks and benefits of treatment.

Many men as they age will develop prostate cancer and not know it, because it’s slow growing and causes no symptoms. Autopsy studies of men who died from other causes have shown that almost 30 percent over the age of 50 have histological evidence of prostate cancer, according to a study published in 2008 in the journal Urology.

In 2013, prostate cancer will strike 238,590 men, killing 29,720. It is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men aside from skin cancer.

###

The study was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson/VA Clinical Scholars Program, the Urology Care Foundation of the American Urologic Association, the American Cancer Society and the National Institutes of Health.



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[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 20-May-2013
[ | E-mail | Share Share ]

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California – Los Angeles Health Sciences

Older prostate cancer patients with other underlying health conditions should think twice before committing to surgery or radiation therapy for their cancer, according to a multicenter study led by researchers in the UCLA Department of Urology.

The study reports the 14-year survival outcomes of 3,000 men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1994 and 1995. The results suggest that older patients with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer and who have at least three underlying health problems, or comorbidities, were much more likely to die of something other than their cancer, said study first author Dr. Timothy Daskivich, a UCLA Robert Wood Johnson fellow.

“For men with low- to intermediate-risk disease, prostate cancer is an indolent disease that doesn’t pose a major risk to survival,” Daskivich said. “The take home point from this study is that older men with multiple underlying health problems should carefully consider whether they should treat these tumors aggressively, because that treatment comes with a price.”

Aggressive treatments for prostate cancer, including surgery, external radiation and radioactive seed implants, can result in major side effects, including erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence and bowel problems. Also, the survival advantage afforded by these treatments does not develop until approximately eight to 10 years after treatment. In many cases, either “watchful waiting” or “active surveillance”- monitoring the patient’s cancer very closely with regular biopsies and intervening with surgery or radiation if the disease progresses – is better than hitting the disease with everything in the treatment arsenal, Daskivich said.

The study appears May 21, 2013 in the early online issue of the peer-reviewed journal Annals of Internal Medicine.

The men in the study completed surveys within six months of diagnosis to document what other medical conditions they had at that time. Researchers then determined survival outcomes at 14 years from the time of diagnosis using information from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database.

“This was a great opportunity to get a glimpse at the long-term outcomes of these men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the mid-1990s,” Daskivich said. “What we were most interested in was their survival outcomes. We wanted to prove that in older men with other health problems, the risk of dying from their cancer paled in comparison to the risk that they’d die from something else.”

The study looked at older patients with three or more comorbidities, such as diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure and arthritis. Researchers found that the 10-year risks of dying from causes other than prostate cancer in men 61 to 74 and men older than 75 with three or more comorbidities were 40 percent and 71 percent, respectively. In comparison, the 14-year risks of dying from low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer were 3 percent and 7 percent, respectively, which Daskivich characterized as low.

“If you’re very unlikely to benefit from treatment, then don’t run the risk and end up dealing with side effects that can significantly impact quality of life,” he said. “It’s important for these men to talk to their doctors about the possibility of forgoing aggressive treatment. We’re not talking about restricting care, but the patient should be fully informed about their likelihood of surviving long enough to benefit from treatment.”

However, Daskivich said, older men with high-risk, aggressive prostate cancers may benefit from treatment so they don’t die of their cancers. The risk of death from high-risk prostate cancer was 18 percent over the 14 years of this study.

Daskivich said there was very little long-term data prior to this study on which patients could base these crucial decisions. The study will result in patients who are much better informed on the risks and benefits of treatment.

Many men as they age will develop prostate cancer and not know it, because it’s slow growing and causes no symptoms. Autopsy studies of men who died from other causes have shown that almost 30 percent over the age of 50 have histological evidence of prostate cancer, according to a study published in 2008 in the journal Urology.

In 2013, prostate cancer will strike 238,590 men, killing 29,720. It is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men aside from skin cancer.

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The study was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson/VA Clinical Scholars Program, the Urology Care Foundation of the American Urologic Association, the American Cancer Society and the National Institutes of Health.



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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-05/uoc–opc051613.php

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